Call us toll-free

Quick academic help

Don't let the stress of school get you down! Have your essay written by a professional writer before the deadline arrives.

Calculate the price

Pages:

275 Words

$19,50

Nietzsche second essay section 12

1. In section 4 of the second essay, Nietzsche asks, "But how did that other 'somber thing,' the consciousness of guilt, the 'bad conscience,' come into the [End Page 35] world?" His answer, when it arrives, involves two distinct stages. The first stage concerns what he calls "the internalisation of man"—the result of the suppression of instinct engendered by enclosure "within the walls of society and peace": "All instincts that do not discharge themselves outwardly ... : thus it was that man first developed what was later called his 'soul.' The entire inner world, originally as thin as if it were stretched between two membranes, expanded and extended itself, acquired depth, breadth, and height, in the same measure as outward discharge was " (GM II.16). This new inner space is presented by Nietzsche as a theater of self-laceration, an arena in which man vents his instinct for cruelty inwardly, upon himself, and Nietzsche refers to this condition as the "bad conscience." Initially, at least, bad conscience is not evenly distributed: those at the apex of the social order (the nobles) experience less repression of instinct, and so are less internalized and less subject to the sufferings of self-cruelty than those at the bottom (the slaves). But even those at the top "are held ... sternly in check ... by custom, respect, usage" (GM I.11); and so even they are subject to some degree of bad conscience. At...

Nietzsche genealogy of morals essay 2 section 12

The second essay of Nietzsche's "polemic," is a rich and elusive piece, full of valuable hints and suggestions, but difficult finally to pin down. The essays that flank it are, in their own ways, more straightforward, and have attracted the lion's share of critical attention—the first essay for its account of the slave revolt in morality, the third for its account of the principal fruit of that revolt, the ascetic ideal. But the second essay is absolutely central, both as glue to hold essays 1 and 3 together and as a source of answers to questions that its companion pieces either elide or leave hanging. In my book, I offered a reading of the second essay in which I tried to clarify its main theme—the bad conscience—and to show how it fitted in with and illuminated the other two essays. Mathias Risse, in a recent article, has objected to that reading. The immediate issue between us—and one central to an understanding of the essay as a whole—concerns the transformation, by a process that Nietzsche calls "moralization," of the concept of debt into the concept of guilt. My view is that the moralizing process, on Nietzsche's account, is essentially independent of transcendental presuppositions, and is logically prior to the invention of (the Christian) God. Risse disagrees. According to him, a moralized concept of guilt necessarily presupposes God, and so is transcendentally informed from the start. But the difference between us is not merely one of exegesis. If Risse is right, the scope of Nietzsche's insights into the process of moralization is restricted to it as it occurs in certain quite narrowly theocratic contexts. If I am right, the scope of those insights is potentially far wider. To this extent, our disagreement is a disagreement about Nietzsche's continuing importance. I begin by setting out my own position (section 1). I then turn to Risse's reading, which depends on three considerations, none of them, in my view, convincing: a postcard that Nietzsche wrote (section 2); an issue about translation (section 3); and the development of ideas culminating, according to him, in section 21 of the 's second essay (section 4). I conclude by explaining why it matters, in the larger scheme of things, that my reading is right (section 5).

Nietzsche Second Essay Section 12

First Essay, Sections 10-12 - SparkNotes

The second essay of Nietzsche's "polemic," is a rich and elusive piece, full of valuable hints and suggestions, but difficult finally to pin down. The essays that flank it are, in their own ways, more straightforward, and have attracted the lion's share of critical attention—the first essay for its account of the slave revolt in morality, the third for its account of the principal fruit of that revolt, the ascetic ideal. But the second essay is absolutely central, both as glue to hold essays 1 and 3 together and as a source of answers to questions that its companion pieces either elide or leave hanging. In my book, I offered a reading of the second essay in which I tried to clarify its main theme—the bad conscience—and to show how it fitted in with and illuminated the other two essays. Mathias Risse, in a recent article, has objected to that reading. The immediate issue between us—and one central to an understanding of the essay as a whole—concerns the transformation, by a process that Nietzsche calls "moralization," of the concept of debt into the concept of guilt. My view is that the moralizing process, on Nietzsche's account, is essentially independent of transcendental presuppositions, and is logically prior to the invention of (the Christian) God. Risse disagrees. According to him, a moralized concept of guilt necessarily presupposes God, and so is transcendentally informed from the start. But the difference between us is not merely one of exegesis. If Risse is right, the scope of Nietzsche's insights into the process of moralization is restricted to it as it occurs in certain quite narrowly theocratic contexts. If I am right, the scope of those insights is potentially far wider. To this extent, our disagreement is a disagreement about Nietzsche's continuing importance. I begin by setting out my own position (section 1). I then turn to Risse's reading, which depends on three considerations, none of them, in my view, convincing: a postcard that Nietzsche wrote (section 2); an issue about translation (section 3); and the development of ideas culminating, according to him, in section 21 of the 's second essay (section 4). I conclude by explaining why it matters, in the larger scheme of things, that my reading is right (section 5).

1. In section 4 of the second essay, Nietzsche asks, "But how did that other 'somber thing,' the consciousness of guilt, the 'bad conscience,' come into the [End Page 35] world?" His answer, when it arrives, involves two distinct stages. The first stage concerns what he calls "the internalisation of man"—the result of the suppression of instinct engendered by enclosure "within the walls of society and peace": "All instincts that do not discharge themselves outwardly ... : thus it was that man first developed what was later called his 'soul.' The entire inner world, originally as thin as if it were stretched between two membranes, expanded and extended itself, acquired depth, breadth, and height, in the same measure as outward discharge was " (GM II.16). This new inner space is presented by Nietzsche as a theater of self-laceration, an arena in which man vents his instinct for cruelty inwardly, upon himself, and Nietzsche refers to this condition as the "bad conscience." Initially, at least, bad conscience is not evenly distributed: those at the apex of the social order (the nobles) experience less repression of instinct, and so are less internalized and less subject to the sufferings of self-cruelty than those at the bottom (the slaves). But even those at the top "are held ... sternly in check ... by custom, respect, usage" (GM I.11); and so even they are subject to some degree of bad conscience. At...

Nietzsche genealogy of morals essay 2 section 12 - aqotwf-es

A summary of First Essay, Sections 10-12 in Friedrich Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals

In section 12 of the Second Essay Nietzsche attempts to expose what he takes to be the Project MUSE - Guilt Before God, or God Before Guilt?
Order now
  • UNMATCHED QUALITY

    As soon as we have completed your work, it will be proofread and given a thorough scan for plagiarism.

  • STRICT PRIVACY

    Our clients' personal information is kept confidential, so rest assured that no one will find out about our cooperation.

  • COMPLETE ORIGINALITY

    We write everything from scratch. You'll be sure to receive a plagiarism-free paper every time you place an order.

  • ON-TIME DELIVERY

    We will complete your paper on time, giving you total peace of mind with every assignment you entrust us with.

  • FREE CORRECTIONS

    Want something changed in your paper? Request as many revisions as you want until you're completely satisfied with the outcome.

  • 24/7 SUPPORT

    We're always here to help you solve any possible issue. Feel free to give us a call or write a message in chat.

Order now
  • You submit your order instructions

  • We assign an appropriate expert

  • The expert takes care of your task

  • We send it to you upon completion

Order now
  • 37 684

    Delivered orders

  • 763

    Professional writers

  • 311

    Writers online

  • 4.8/5

    Average quality score

Order now
  • Kim

    "I have always been impressed by the quick turnaround and your thoroughness. Easily the most professional essay writing service on the web."

  • Paul

    "Your assistance and the first class service is much appreciated. My essay reads so well and without your help I'm sure I would have been marked down again on grammar and syntax."

  • Ellen

    "Thanks again for your excellent work with my assignments. No doubts you're true experts at what you do and very approachable."

  • Joyce

    "Very professional, cheap and friendly service. Thanks for writing two important essays for me, I wouldn't have written it myself because of the tight deadline."

  • Albert

    "Thanks for your cautious eye, attention to detail and overall superb service. Thanks to you, now I am confident that I can submit my term paper on time."

  • Mary

    "Thank you for the GREAT work you have done. Just wanted to tell that I'm very happy with my essay and will get back with more assignments soon."

Ready to tackle your homework?

Place an order